B-feeding babies can prevent T1?

That's what the study in this article is claiming, anyway:

http://health.yahoo.com/news/ap/us_med_breast_feeding_savings.html

But, what if the mother is a T1?  Would that negate the benefits?  Thoughts? 

I actually asked my endo this question because I had read a similar articles including, http://www.articlecity.com/articles/parenting/article_1234.shtml and http://www.dlife.com/diabetes/information/type-1/diabetes-causes/ . He said that there is currently nothing concerete proving that it will prevent type 1, but the antibodies present in breast milk would only help the baby in general - so there is no harm. I am curretly 19 weeks pregnant and I plan to breastfeed for a minimum of a year, just in case. Whether or not the study/articles are true, why not just try anyway?

My mom breastfed my brother and me for 9 months each.  My brother was dx'd at 9years old and I was dx'd at 26 years old.  So who the heck knows?  I guess maybe if she had breastfed us until we were 3 years old, like some of the more zealous advocates propose, we may have had a different outcome?  I breastfed my daughter for a year, but not because of anything related to diabetes.  It was just what I wanted to do for other reasons and health benefits.  I would try not to get too hung up on studies/articles and just do what feels right to you. 

I breastedf my kids at least the first 6 months. I know there is a body of research that implicated the ingestion of cows milk at an early age to an increased incidence of T1, so I kept my kids away from that untill 12 months.

Didn't work out for me.  My mom breast fed me and I ended up with T1.  I hear breast feeding is very good for the BG levels of moms who have T1 though. 

No, wouldn't negate benefits, migth even say more important to be aware of the potential risks/benefits to certain timing on introduction of foods.

 

We are participating in a study that will look closer at what does and doesn't trigger onset of diabetes, so while things look one way or another, the studies haven't been comprehensive enough til this point to really answer the question.  There's another one (we do TRIGR) called TEDDY looking at similar and more. 

 

Breastfeeding is the ideal, not everyone is able to find a way to make it work for them, or to make it work for all of the baby's needs, but there are so many benefits, its really worth learning all you can about and getting a support team in place before the baby arrives.  Good luck!