Better to raise a BG- Juice or Glucose Tabs

I took your advice...thank you...the best advice in weeks!!!!

Hello...I also don't have insurance, I go to a free health clinic. If you meet income guidelines you can get a free year of Humalog and I think a three month supply of Lantus. I'm not sure where to get the Lantus paperwork because the clinic did it for me but here is the Humalog website: http://www.lillycares.com/Pages/index.aspx

Also, there are coupons online you can download to get 5 free Humalog quickpens. You can probably find other things by just doing a ton of searching on the Internet but those are the only ones I know of at this point. Good luck! Not having insurance sucks! =0(

You're not going to be able to find health insurance unless you get it through your job.  Some states also have a high risk insurance option, but it's pretty expensive.  Companies like Starbucks and WalMart used to provide insurance for employees who worked 30 hours, but not sure if that's still true.  When I haven't had insurance I just paid out of pocket.  Shots aren't super expensive if you reuse needles, but using less effective insulin (ie: Regular instead of Novolog) and generic test strips and meter are cheaper.  You'll have to find someone to write a prescription for your insulin. 

Go the websites of the insulin mfgs and test strip mfgs that you use. Many will have reduced cost programs for people without insurance. Keep using the internet. You don't need a prescription to by syringes and in most (all?) states you do not need a prescription for regular insulin. (Though as jenna pointed out, it is not as effective as Novolog/Lantus). I would also make sure you get a doctor visit in before you go off insurance and ask their office. They may have a social worker or department that can also help you navigate this.

Here are some I know of, but there may be more that are specific to your state:

 

Companies that donate supplies:

 

-Medisense Meter:  Donates free meters and strips 1-800-527-3339

-Lilly Care:  Donate free insulin.  A patient can apply for a 3-month supply of insulin for free, but must submit a new application each time. The patient needs the doctor's involvement or letter stating the need for insulin. 1-800-545-6962

-Medic Alert: Donates free sterling silver bracelets or necklaces. 1-800-432-5378

-Lifescan:  Contact for assistance with glucose monitor supplies.  1-800-227-8862

-Freemeds.com You cannot have an insurance prescription card and access this program, but you can have insurance and this program.  1-888-722-7556

-You may obtain some meters, test strips and other diabetes supplies other people no longer need from the "Angel Network:" www.medosa.com/dws-free_drugs.htm

-Together Rx is a free prescroption savings program for qualified individuals and families without prescription drug coverage:  www.togetherrxaccess.com

-Aventis: Donates Lantis insulin.  1-800-221-4025

 

And don't forget to LET YOUR CONGRESSMEN KNOW what a pain it is for you to access decent healthcare for your diabetes when you don't have insurance.  They won't know unless we keep telling them!!!

 

Good luck!!!!

The new health care law allows you to stay on your parents' insurance until you are 26 years old. The insurance company can't kick you off of your

parents' policy any more.

     I don't have insurance. I didn't have it before I was diagnosed with T1D and I don't have it now. I see an APN  diabetic educator at a free clinic. I also get my insulin free from aventis-sanofi (not sure how that is spelled) because I have a low income. You can get all the required paperwork from the clinic if you have limited internet use. The clinic should fill the forms out and submit them for you. The program is called patient assistance. Normally the clinic will give you test strips and a meter on your first appointment if you do not have one now. They will also give you diabetic supplies (test strips, insulin syringes, ketone test strips, etc), sometimes insulin (if they have samples) at a nominal price. For example, I can get two boxes of test strips (100 ct) for 10 dollars. Talk to your local doctors because they will know somebody, who knows somebody who can help you out. Worst case scenario go to the ER. In the US the ER cannot refuse to care for you b/c you have no insurance. After you get out of the hospital fill out the necessary paper work to have your hospitalization written off. If you don't make enough money to pay your hospital bill this is a good option. Hospitals have to donate a certain portion of their income to charity, and this is one way they do it. Start planning now for your non-insurance life that way if it happens you won't have to go with out your diabetic supplies. Also, uninsured individuals (at least where I live) cannot receive insulin pumps, so if you are not on a pump and want to be you will need to do that while you are insured. Hope this helps.

Actually part of the health care legislation does help you in this case. You can't be denied coverage because of a pre-existing condition. And your parents provider has to cover you until age 26. I work in HR and all of these rules are a big pain to me for work, but now that I have a daughter with Type 1, I'm finding some of these things are really helpful. 

I have a neighbor that never used doctors and complained about heath care regulations until one of their kids in college got cancer and one of the parents were diagnosed with cancer within a month of each other. 

Why do people need to suffer personally before they can see the benefit of this?

It reminds me of how a certain political party fought safety regulations to prevent kids from being sucked into pool and spa drains. They fought them for years until Jim Baker, President George H W Bush's most important staff member lost his granddaughter when her hair was sucked down a spa drain and no amount of bystanders could pull her out. SHe drowned in the hands of people desperately trying to rescue her in vain. Then the safety rules were passed. 

 

 

 

My point wasn't that I'm not in favor of the regulations or that I ever wasn't. It's that it creates a great deal of work that prevents me from spending time on doing things like hiring new people.

Regardless, it's one of those things that is very helpful to the people on this site and will hopefully make life better.

 

Hi Tressa,

I'm sorry to hear of your friend passing away. I think that a lot of people, young girls especially, suffer from this. I went through a time where I tried to cut back eating so that I could get away with taking less insulin. It's tough to gain weight when it's not your fault, it's the insulin. But health should always be top priority, people that are worried about gaining need to remember that taking insulin and eating well is all to help their body and stay healthy. I hope this helps a little.

Hi Tressa,

I am also sorry for the loss of your friend.  I also agree with Cheyanne.   Although, I have not personally experienced diabulimia, I can imagine that it must be hard for younger people these days, especially with the media & fashion industry giving mixed ideas of what's "beautiful" - whether skinny or curvy is beauty.  While I believe that as long as you are happy with who you are and you are confident in yourself, that is real beauty, it is also important to remember that health is priority over any aesthetic appearance.  This is easier said than done, but it is not worth jeopardizing your life for something you cannot control and others should respect and accept.  

Good luck with your paper! 

First heard of shorting insulin to avoid gainining weight when I was at diabetic summer camp.  I was 12 and one of the other girls in my cabin was telling us about a "great" way to eat whatever you wanted and not gain weight.  That was 25 years ago and I've always wondered what happened to her and hope that she is okay now. 

I've struggled with other eating disorders but not diabulemia, at least not intentionally.  When I was younger I had times when I'd eaten so much that my blood sugar was high and I was too tired or depressed to take a shot. It never was a long term thing or something I purposefully did to lose weight. 

My last endocrinologist said many of her diabetic patients struggle with eating disorders and food issues.  It makes sense since we spend so much time focusing on food and what's good and bad.  

It scares me that newly diagnosed diabetics are still told to eat strict "diabetic" diets or told to exclude sugary foods.  Carb counting and insulin pumps have been life changing since they allow us to eat more normally and not eat when we're not hungry.  

Tressa,

I am sorry to hear about your friend. I myself suffered from this and have over come it. I was diagnosed at 14, right when I was entering my puberty/hormonal stage in life. At first I followed directions and did as I was told,but noticed I was putting on fast weight. I then got frustrated and decided that I just didn't want to deal with it. After two weeks of not taking my insulin correctly I noticed quick weight falling off. I thought it was awesome and of course since I was early onset diabetes the aftermath of high sugars hadn't started to settle in yet. I still took my insulin but skipped nighttime doses and even checking my blood sugar. I always told myself that thinner was better. At 16 I had goen from a size 12 to a 3 and even though I felt like death I thought it was wonderful. I felt prettier because the boys were paying more attention to me. A year later I was 5'4" and only 98 pounds. You could literally see every bone in my body, my back looked like an ethiopians. My parents forced me into the hospital, I was malnutritious and developed some horrible side effects that I still deal with today. I developed Neuropathy (usually takes at least 10 years to get from diabetes), gasteroparesis, high blood pressure, and tachycardia. I then was taking 36 pills a day along with my shots. Because of this 360 change in my levels I then retained fluids on my feet and hands that made me look like a cabbage patch doll and my stomach stuck out like I was pregnant but with tiny legs and arms. Once I started gaining alot of weight again I freaked out and waited for my parents to stop payign attention to start again. From age 18-20 I wasn't as bad as I was at 14, but I still wasn't taking care of myself like I should. My levels were still high, but I dealt with it because it was keeping me thin. I didn't binge eat like I used to in order to lose weight super quick, but I still wasn't eating healthy either. I didn't start taking care of myself until my dad passed away in 2009 of congested heart failure. It teaches you that you're definately not promised tomorrow. I am now 22 and I still suffer every day in keeping everything leveled out. I sometimes have to check my sugar 8+ times a day because of my digestive disorder I have developed. I didn't think it was such an issue back then, and I didn't care at all. It really is such an important issue in young diabetics, especially young girls. Which I feel as if someone had warned me I probably would have been like "whatever i'll do as I want". But the condition is far worse than people would think. It brings on depression, and I used to get anxiety attacks all the time because my heart wasn't strong enough to deal with what I was putting my body through. I'v learned that things could be far worse in life than having diabetes. You can live a perfectly normal life with diabetes. I am now married and have started a wonderful life with him. He's kind of a drill sergent when it comes to my diabetes, but I need that in my life. There definately needs to be more support for people out there that suffer from this. But I am proud to say that I take all my medicine correctly and go to the gym twice a week. I have gained weight that I wish wasn't there, but it's not as bad as it could be. I am happy and healthy and that's what counts.

Sorry for the loss of your friend Tressa,

 I actually remebering hearing young girls and nurses talking about this way back in the early 90's when I used to attend a Diabetic summer camp.  The camp had the guys and girls divided up into different cabins and sides of camp. A lot of us young male diabetics would actually wonder why you ladies would even try that. For us males growing up, weight meant muscle strength and many of us found ourselves struggling to keep the weight on. Most young diabetic guys would talk about how they struggled to make a weight requirements for wrestling or other athletic  school programs. Much the opposite way of lossing we felt pressured to gain.

  The thing is we discovered early on that the body and its digestive system was meant to be a energy storage device for our energy and a natural means of  survival for any human .  I remeber feeling embrassed when my scrawny 86 lb frame at 13 would run out of fuel running cross country or track  usally before the normal guys or having to stop becuase of a low blood sugar exhuasting me or making me feel weak. The idea that not taking your insulin helps you lose weight is beyond me. When the body cant turn the protien/fat and glucose it has stored in you then your body starves-all its cells and organs. Then we are damaged by the proteins now running rampant through our bloodstreams as our sugars swing out of control and we slide towards DKA.  Yes folks the Adtkins diet kills you. 

  I fought my way though high school weight lifting classes to get 180 lbs by the time I was 18.  Flash foward to today with a job, bills and fighting to control sugars I struggle to keep the weight up above 130 to meet the healthy minmum weight and body fat percentage for a male of my age and health. My doctor likes to yell at me becuase she actually thought I had Diabulimia when I lost 10 lbs in less then a month. Spent four months in a hospital  after a severe late night insulin reaction where she and the staff kept having to increase my carb and protein intakes at meals just to keep my body from  consuming itself and to keep my bloodsugars from crashing. 

   Truth is your body already know what it needs to do to survive. In our case we just need insulin to help that process. Society and media will always try to pressure us into  thinking or believing something that is counter to our natural being and in many cases our own well being. Listen  and give credit to your body and not to anything else.  No one else is using your ears, eyes, hands, feet, heart or mind so what gives them the right to define who or what you really are?  That is your right, your choice and your power. Why on earth would you give that power away to someone else or the idea of an image?

  True respect in this world is defined and created from within an individual.  Those outside the individual will naturally gravitate and respect that which commands its own self and intra-personal respect. You get back whatever you invest in yourself not what you take away or try to throw away and that includes respect and love.  Something to remeber  when you begin to question yourself or stand in front of that mirror in the mornings. Try telling yourself something positve and  reaffirming next time you brush your teeth.  I know that may not sound like much coming from a guy but deep down its something I believe we all really know.  You really can do six impossible things before breakfast and twelve impossible things before lunch if you just give them the energy and the chance. You do just one of those things every day you wake up and take your first deep breath of fresh air.

My reaction, when I first learned about it, was that it would be such an easy trap to fall into.  I wasn't diagnosed until I was 30, and I kept having some weird thoughts go through my head early in treatment.  Two that come to mind are:

"I could eat ANYTHING before and not gain weight.  Now that I'm supposedly healthy, I'm probably just going to get fat."

When I struggled with reaching blood sugar goals early on: "The problem is this damn insulin treatment.  Everything was fine before I started treatment."  (Of course, I felt like total crap before and I simply didn't know what my blood sugar was doing.)

I could see someone both struggling with weight and all of society's unrealistic pressures to have a certain figure and being sick and tired of treating their diabetes and just saying "screw it," and starting to skip injections.  Then they start losing weight and people tell them they look great and it's just downhill from there.  Vicious cycle, just like with any other eating disorder, it becomes an ingrained psychological issue that can't be solved by just deciding to eat a normal meal and take the appropriate bolus.

My endo commented once that these people just kind of skim right below DKA.  I'm pretty sure that's about where my blood sugar lingered before I got diagnosed.  I knew something was wrong, but it was something I was able to ignore for longer than I could imagine now.  People could fool themselves into thinking they're OK.

[quote user="Michael Nichols"]

   Truth is your body already know what it needs to do to survive. In our case we just need insulin to help that process. Society and media will always try to pressure us into  thinking or believing something that is counter to our natural being and in many cases our own well being. Listen  and give credit to your body and not to anything else.  No one else is using your ears, eyes, hands, feet, heart or mind so what gives them the right to define who or what you really are?  That is your right, your choice and your power. Why on earth would you give that power away to someone else or the idea of an image?

  True respect in this world is defined and created from within an individual.  Those outside the individual will naturally gravitate and respect that which commands its own self and intra-personal respect. You get back whatever you invest in yourself not what you take away or try to throw away and that includes respect and love.  Something to remeber  when you begin to question yourself or stand in front of that mirror in the mornings. Try telling yourself something positve and  reaffirming next time you brush your teeth.  I know that may not sound like much coming from a guy but deep down its something I believe we all really know.  You really can do six impossible things before breakfast and twelve impossible things before lunch if you just give them the energy and the chance. You do just one of those things every day you wake up and take your first deep breath of fresh air.

 

[/quote]

I just wanted to thank you for this post. It is great to hear from a guy's perspective about this. Your words were so inspiring!!

Ooops, somehow posted twice!

I also wanted to say how sorry I am to hear about the loss of your friend.  While I have not had diabulimia (heck, didn't even know what it was til after I'd gained the weight back from accidental DKA).  I was diagnosed at 27 years old but since I weighed 238lbs at the time of my diagnosis (I'd lost 20lbs since August which I thought I'd done because of weight watchers despite cheating) on 10/27/05 they told me I was type 2 and put me on metformin, sent to to the dietitian and on my way home.  I spent the next full year on different oral meds, and then towards the end a 70/30 pen with no plans for corrections etc.  My a1c was 15.2 at the end of that year.  I weighed 152lbs   I went from a size 18/20 to a size 6/8  NEVER in my adult life have I been that thin. I literally could eat anything in sight and be in a new clothing size fairly frequently.

I'll never forget the fateful December 2006  day: I was at work. I was short of breath.  I had lunchtime errands to run.  I have asthma, so I used my inhaler.  I called the advice nurse at my pcps office before said errands and left a msg. She called me back at 2pm.  I told her I suddenly couldn't climb my own stairs at home without almost passing out.  When I took a deep breath - my top of my stomach under my ribs puckered in instea of puffing out. I had a history of collapsed lung, so I went to the ER (drove straight from work). 

When I arrived they ran tests looking for lung issues, did a chest xray, no one was concerned. I called my hubby and said I bet I'm out of here by 5pm (slow day in er).  I was all alone in the er bed and my heart monitor starts alarming over, and over, and over.  I see a nurse and say UM, hello, why is this things alarm going off???  She said I'll get the doctor, you're having some PVCs.  He came back and said I see you have diabetes, do you have type 1 diabetes? I said NO, I have type 2, but I've lost a lot of weight.  He had to have a new IV for arterial gases and then the results came back. He said my PH was pretty bad and I have diabetic ketoacidosis.  I didn't even know what that meant. He basicly said my heart was just starting to be affected, that my body was being eaten up for energy including my muscle and that there was too much carbon dioxide in my lungs which is why my chest had started sucking in instead of puffing out when I took deep breaths earlier that day.  I was admitted for 4 days and gained nearly 40lbs back in water weight at the end of it. 

While I enjoyed the attention of the weight loss, looking back tells me I was in DKA for well over a year and was fortunate I wasn't as sick as I was on the day I went to the ER.  I didn't understand what to do next and my doctor didn't even follow up on me.  So I changed docs May 2007 and one month later I guess I was still in mild dka so had to be admitted for 2-3 days for fluids and some tighter control. 

These days I weigh what I did when I started because I spent over a year eating EVERYTHING I could and not gaining an ounce and so after being put on a more insulin dependent treatment schedule and then the pump in March 08 I gained it back before I could figure out how to NOT gain it all back!  But my A1C is getting lower and I will continue to work on a balance of both weight and great control! 

If anyone is interested in seeing my before diagnosis and before proper treatment of dka, you can see the disturbing under neck skin from rapid weight loss lol or I can email them to you for your paper, I don't mind

Hello Tressa, first I'm very sorry about your friend may she Rest In Peace. It makes me sad that any one would resort to eating disorders. But the way society is it makes it hard for people to feel beautiful about their body. I have not suffered from a eating disorder but I have had self esteem issues because my sisters are a size 0 (she has a fast metabolism and is very active) and my other sister is a size 7. and i barley fit into a size 11. and while i know it's a little more difficult because of diabetes but it's still hard to deal with.

but it makes me feel helpless i guess that there are so many people out there who put their life in danger just to lose wight.