Dexcom - Receiver for an 11 year old

My very active son was diagnosed last week. My wife and I will need to have visibility to his readings during his athletic events. Would he be able to wear a Smart Watch instead of a phone to upload his readings to the cloud in real time - or does he need to have a phone. He plays highly competitive ice hockey, so carrying a full phone during games and practices may not be realistic.

Thanks.

Hi @ChicagoHockey welcome to TypeOneNation. No you need a phone and it needs a cellular data connection or WiFi connection for you to read the CGM. You could use a sports arm band and have the phone under the hockey uniform and padding.

I understand why you would want to see his numbers constantly but even if you didn’t have CGM you’d just test more and after a while you’ll know where he wants to be with sugars for a game/practice. He’ll need fast carbs and regular breaks to be able to adjust.

The CGM isn’t all that accurate when blood sugars are changing fast, his safest bet is a finger stick test especially during activity.

Good luck!

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Hi -

I’m also in Chicago and have a 10 year old son who plays hockey. My 13 year old daughter has a Dexcom which reads to her iphone and to her Apple watch. The Dex reads to the phone not the watch - so it’s the phone that needs to be in proximity. Although he could put his phone on a spibelt around the waist, I would not recommend wearing his phone during hockey. I think maybe the best solution would be for him to keep his phone on the bench and you will get a reading when he skates close by or is sitting out for a shift.

My daughter dances and she leaves her phone on the side of the studio and still gets a reading throughout, but that’s a much smaller space than a rink. However, when she’s at a performance or at the pool she’ll just come back occasionally to her phone to get a reading. The Dex reads every 5 minutes and if you are out of range so that it can’t read, it will fill in the gaps and give you all the readings you missed when you get back in range. With time and experience you will also have a better idea of what your son needs to keep his blood sugars steady during exercise.

I hope this helps, feel free to reach out directly if you have any other questions.

@ChicagoHockey Hi Nathan, and welcome to the TypeOneNation Forum!

As @Joe said, cellular technology is needed to transmit the glucose information to “a cloud” in order for you or your wife to be able to retrieve that data. All the available continuous glucose readers [that I’ve seen] can transmit only via BTE low energy. That said, I’ve found that my DexCom G6 transmitter connects well with my Galaxy phone at a considerable distance and doesn’t miss glucose readings.
As Nareen @nkim wrote, a viable solution could be to place your son’s phone on the bench, near center ice, where it will pick-up signals from a CGM. Just be aware, that especially during rapid change in glucose level, that body glucose level [BGL], glucose level in the interstitial fluid from which a CGM gets its information, will lag behind blood glucose [BG] level by 10 to 20 minutes. Use finger-stick BG reading between periods to make your guess at how much your son should eat before start of the next period.

Especially at the beginning, it will be a guessing game - as I have found by living with diabetes for 60++ years. Be conservative; eat more than “calculations” suggest and, if necessary, a high glucose level can be corrected later - wait four hours before making a correction.

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