Friend's just dont get what we have to deal with

My friend just dont get what i have to do every day in and day out. This is how my day goes, 1st i get up and test my BG's and than i go and i get my breckfast and i have to put in on my pump,And after i do that i go to school.

Jaimie,

It is always hard trying to get people to understand what we are going through. It is just something we need to take the time, trying to get our friends and family to get a clue of what we face on a daily basis. The JDRF created a document called Diabetes Simulator, which is something that people can do if they want the real experience of what we go through, granted this file was created based upon using MDI and not a pump, but if your friends really want to have an idea about what you face on a daily basis, you should have them follow the life of a diabetic, using this simulator.

Your 24-hour Schedule with Juvenile Diabetes
For the next 24 hours, you have type-one diabetes.   Follow the schedule below and make sure that every time it indicates “Blood Glucose Check” or “Insulin Administered” you give yourself a good snap with the rubber band!  You will learn a lot about what it is to have juvenile diabetes, but there is one important difference:  at the end of the 24 hours, you can take off the bracelet and go on with your life.  We hope that you will continue to wear it for the many people with juvenile diabetes, young and old, who cannot “take their diabetes off”. 

Time    Action
 7:00  a.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 269)
    Eat Breakfast (Calculate carbohydrate grams)
Insulin administered (Amount determined by # of carbs and anticipated activity)

 9:30  a.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 60)
    Have juice to bring blood Glucose up.    

11:51   a.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 106)
    Eat Lunch (Calculate carbohydrates)
Insulin administered (Amount determined by # of carbs and anticipated activity)

 3:05  p.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 167)

 6:10   p.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 109)

 6:45  p.m.    Insulin administered (Amount determined by # of carbs consumed)
    Eat Dinner (Calculate carbohydrates)
 
7:45  p.m.    Blood Glucose Check. 
    Insulin administered (Amount determined by # of carbs consumed)
    Eat Dinner (Calculate carbohydrates)

 9:00  p.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 56)
    Have juice to bring Blood Glucose up.  Have snack whether hungry or not.
    Check Blood Glucose again in 15 minutes.

 9:15   p.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 70)
    Coming up, but not high enough yet.  Check again in 15 minutes.

 9:30  p.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 85)

12:03  a.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 306)
    Insulin administered to reduce high Blood Glucose.

 3:00  a.m.    Blood Glucose Check (Reading: 260)
    Insulin administered to reduce high Blood Glucose.

Most friends don't understand. I have never(in person) met another person with type 1 diabetes. Most of my friends haven't either. It is hard for the both of us but everyone doesn't go through what we do. The easiest way to understand it is too do it and if they can't be diabetic, they can't understand really well. Sure they can know what it is and what we do but I realized that they just don't know what  it feels like or how to do most parts of it. So, if they don't understand, it's not their fault that they didn't get diabetes... 

I totally agree that it's hard for others to "get" all the tough stuff we're going through. Even something like a "diabetes simulator" (which is a great idea, thanks for posting!) doesn't get at the emotional stress of it. But at the same time, we probably don't "get" what our friends are going through in THEIR lives. For example, I have friends who have lost a parent, and, thank God, I can't even begin to imagine what they've been through. I have a friend whose husband was just treated for cancer -- while I tried to help her with everything I could, I can't understand what her life has been like. I always try to remind myself that D is awful, but it doesn't mean that others don't have their own trials to "survive."

yea i see what you mean..

i have a badly infected pump site and my leg was in a lot of pain today and i couldn't go to the doctor and i was telling my friend why i was in pain and she was like "well i have a shoe mark in my back from falling off my bed and i have a papercut" i had a minor freakout at her because she makes those comments a lot...

it's hard to find people who understand.. that's what juvenation is for!!!!!

thanks guy's and girl's

haha. I dont like changing my site, so I only change it after it gets infected and isnt working anymore.. well no Im trying to get better at that, just I dont always have time.. But I get what ou mean., I try to seperate my D from my friends. even though its part of me, they just dont get it, and I know that it would be akward hanging out with someone with a medical condition, so to be serious, since I keep it under the wraps, thy dont think my D is that big of a deal, and dont mention it ever, or anything.. so I take care of all my meds, all by myself, all the time. It can make me mad at times that nobody knows what Im doing or how to help me if I needed it.but I kinda like being able to be self suficient. and not put my friends in the spot.

i love the girls on my volleyball team. they are like my best friends. typically if i have any D problems at practice or at a game, its a low. and they are so great about it. one of the girls will come with me to the locker room and i'll test and eat. they sometimes ask questions, but it doesn't bug me. and they don't try to compare it,  there was one time i was really high at practice and i just had to sit in the locker room by myself for like an hour cause they couldn't sit with me, so about every 10 minutes one of the girls would come check on me. they are so sweet. lol and they don't understand, but they also don;t think they  have to, we're a team and we're always there for each other no matter what,

just tell your friends that you know and they know that its not the same, but just to take it in stride and be helpful and caring. but don't let them let it slow you down

They just don't understand because they don't have to go through it. They don't have to stick to a schedual like we do. Mine is very hectic.

[quote user="Janna"]

i love the girls on my volleyball team. they are like my best friends. typically if i have any D problems at practice or at a game, its a low. and they are so great about it. one of the girls will come with me to the locker room and i'll test and eat. they sometimes ask questions, but it doesn't bug me. and they don't try to compare it,  there was one time i was really high at practice and i just had to sit in the locker room by myself for like an hour cause they couldn't sit with me, so about every 10 minutes one of the girls would come check on me. they are so sweet. lol and they don't understand, but they also don;t think they  have to, we're a team and we're always there for each other no matter what,

just tell your friends that you know and they know that its not the same, but just to take it in stride and be helpful and caring. but don't let them let it slow you down

[/quote]

That's kewl! I wish my volleyball team was lke that. The girls on my team are super nice and they know we're a team but my coach won't let them always be like one unless it revolves around messups. Then, one person messes up and we all mess up and suffer together...

 

oh thats no fun. yea thats the good part about a tiny school. we stick pretty close. we all play like every sport together.

[quote user="Janna"]

oh thats no fun. yea thats the good part about a tiny school. we stick pretty close. we all play like every sport together.

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my school is tiny too, But that doesnt make a difference for me... I doubt most of my teachers know about it even.. Im pretty sure only my last years socials, and science teachers know.. and I dont have them this year 0_o.. wow.

Having people to support you is truly awesome. If you can find someone even better. It is not always the case. The only thing you can do is to try and continually educate them and hope they will get the point eventaully. Sadly though, we need to also support them. You can say I almost blacked out in gym class, but thankfully I was able to get some sugar into me. And if your friend replies, Oh, yeah I almost blacked out when I saw the blood on my finger from when I got a paper cut. It is obviously not the same thing, but as a friend it can't always be just about us. We need to give and take in our friendships and realize there is not always even ground or background to the two scenarios.

i hate having to explain things to non-diabetic friends. my friend asked me what a insulin pump was and i was like im not explaining it again and then she kinda got mad at me, its just hard. i feel so alone sometimes, like none of my friends will ever understand my struggle. hopefully once i get my insulin pump there will not be any more simple questions. i almost want to yell at my bff's, go on google if you want information bout diabetes, plus some of my friends take advantage of me. when the was a project on diabetes, instead of researching the info for themselves they want me to do the work for them/ give them the answers. why should it be my job to do the project for them? i am human not supergirl! GEEZ!

I feel the EXACT same way. Its amazing how these forums on diabets just take what I am thinking and put it on the screen. I just got the pump as well, about 4 weeks ago. I try describing it to my roomates but it just doesnt do it any justice. I get so frustrated. They have NO idea what my life is like, my everyday struggles. I just feel so alone at college with this time- consuming, 24hr disease. Its good to know others out there feel the same awy, but its hard for that to help me deal with the present

[quote user="Sarah"]

I totally agree that it's hard for others to "get" all the tough stuff we're going through. Even something like a "diabetes simulator" (which is a great idea, thanks for posting!) doesn't get at the emotional stress of it. But at the same time, we probably don't "get" what our friends are going through in THEIR lives. For example, I have friends who have lost a parent, and, thank God, I can't even begin to imagine what they've been through. I have a friend whose husband was just treated for cancer -- while I tried to help her with everything I could, I can't understand what her life has been like. I always try to remind myself that D is awful, but it doesn't mean that others don't have their own trials to "survive."

[/quote]

^^^^^^^^^

THIS

Of course they don't get it.  How could they?  They don't have it. Not to get off on the religious tangent again, but everyone has their cross to bear.  It could always be worse.  This often helps me with things.  Look around and see how bad some people have it.  Childhood cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, thalidomide babies, muscular distrophy, schizophrenics living on the street.  Then what I have maybe doesn't seem so bad after all.

Also, why do we feel the need to educate everyone around us about it?  I don't care if they know or not.  I just do my thing.  I do tell people like boss and customers when I'm working on site what to do if I become disoriented, but that's it.  Everyone else doesn't really need to know.  If they get it, they'll find out.  I didn't know anything about it when I got it, but I learned.  So will they if they have to.  I hope they don't though.

 

 

yeah, i think the most annoying thing for me is if my number is really high so i am up all night…and i go to school late because of it, and then my friends ask, "why are you late, were you trying to skip that test? did you not finish your homework?"
but then they feel really bad after they see me shaking when i’m low or what it’s really like to be 400

I kown today this girl is like done't diabetes happen is to fat people and i was like no that is T2

I think friends don't understand sympathetically but they can try empathetically. I've got a friend who's on here, and that to me - her effort to try and understand more - means more to me than her understanding ever could. Besides, for her to understand, she'd most likely have to go through this herself. And that is something I would never wish on neither a friend nor a stranger.

you have it backwards, alyssa. sympathy means they HAVE been there know what you are going through because they have done it too. empathy means they are trying to understand through your feelings, but have never experienced it themselves.

 

my friends are very good at understanding. while most of them (i have a few t1 friends) haven't been there before, they are great at sharing my feelings and supporting me however they can.