How to get a commercial claiming soda can cause D in kids off the air?

Good morning all. A local organization that encourages healthy eating in our community, is running a new TV ad in which it shows a bottle of soda and urges parents to give water instead of sugary drinks that cause obesity and Diabetes in children. Does anyone have any tips on how I can go about getting this tripe off the air? I wrote  to the JDRF and ADA to ask if they can offer any help and someone from the JDRF suggested i post here. I did post links with facts on their FB page, but Somehow I don't think that comments on their FB page will accomplish what I want. They have commented back siting the JDRF as one of their sources for info. Then they deleted it and posted again also siting ADA as a source. Though this ad is running every night during news and during family shows (so that my son has seen it) I cannot find video for it online. This is their facebook. https://www.facebook.com/HealthyPima/posts/261705973949368?comment_id=1165934¬if_t=like and this is their website http://healthypima.org/ Does anyone have suggestions? I know ads like this have been pulled in other places before. Thanks.

 


I'm not sure why you want it pulled? I don't think that sugary sodas are good for kids - any kids. Whether or not it causes diabetes is not my issue. I think that kids intake too much sugar in any form (but especially soda) and it makes it harder for them to do well in school and stay calm.

I don't think sugary drinks are good for kids either. But I also don't think it's appropriate to spread misconceptions about any form of Diabetes. I

Well who really knows what causes type 1, for all we know it could be the sugary drinks.  I think it is different for everyone.

Sugar drinks don't cause T1, but there has been some link shown between obesity and T2. It doesn't mean that all obese people get D, and you can certainly get type 2 and not be obese, but the obesity is shown to be a link. There are many obese young people (who drink a ton of sugary drinks) who develop T2. It is no longer called "adult onset diabetes" for a reason.