Loosing lots of hair

Does anyone know of any home remedies for helping? My daughters endo doc had mentioned it might happen and it has started. If anyone has tips that would help with regrowth or slowing it down I would really appreciate any suggestions.

Hi @bltfamily1 . Here’s a link to some previous discussions - some comments have links and others have suggestions of things you could try. You might also consult a dermatologist.
All the best to you!

1 Like

Brook @bltfamily1 , hair loss is a relatively common symptom in diagnosing diabetes. If there is any good news, the remedy is good, effective diabetes management. That “cure” is much easier written than accomplished. Note too, that diabetes is not the only cause for people to loose hair.

with time, as your daughter’s body recovers from the shock [I recall you mentioning that she was in KDA when diagnosed] caused by possibly long-term elevated BGL before diagnosis, and the acetone poisoning [ketoacidosis] her hair growth will return to what it had been. It can take time while managing her glucose and ketone levels; but it can be done.

1 Like

Yes you are correct she went through all those issues I will give it some time, thank you

Hi, @bltfamily1! I had the exact same issue when I was in DKA and first diagnosed. I started taking Spring Valley Vitamin B Complex gummies. It is heavy in B vitamins (obviously) and biotin - all necessary for strong/healthy hair, skin and nails. You can find this at most pharmacies, including at the grocery store. I hope this helps. I know how self-conscious I was surrounding my hair loss. It takes a while, but I am back to pre-diagnosis locks now!

1 Like

I’ll second the dermatologist recommendation.

T1D is an autoimmune disease - your body stops making insulin because your own immune system has attacked the cells that do that job. It’s not uncommon for people with one autoimmune disease to develop others. Including alopecia - autoimmune hair loss. As far as I know, that’s not treatable. (I tried several options, like Rogaine, steroid shots, and supplements, but nothing helped.) But if she does have it, it’s better to know and understand.

Going bald at 12 wasn’t easy. I started wearing hats in public. Until I went to a high school that didn’t allow students to wear hats in the building. They offered to make an exception for me, but pointed out it would make me stand out much more than simply walking around bald would. I got used to it.

But it’s much easier for a man than a woman. Often, women with alopecia will wear wigs. Which may feel weird, but if you can take it as an opportunity for self-expression, it can have its advantages.

Of course, that may not be what’s happening at all. And alopecia can express itself differently. Some only develop a small patch, some (like me) lose all their hair across the entire body (which, for a woman, means there’s no need to shave your legs).

So, like I said: Check with a dermatologist. See if that’s what’s going on, or if there’s some other cause. And then you can talk about what treatments might be available. Much better to get evaluation and guidance from a medical professional who can actually examine her and run tests than have strangers online make guesses.

2 Likes

over the counter Bioten is a big help

1 Like

Hi @Dev_Renae . I thought I would try the gummies but haven’t been able to find the brand at my local CVS or Target. Where do you get them?