Most suportive thing

I know there are plenty of times when people just don't get it and say and do the wrong thing concerning reactions to your diabetes...but I would love to hear what things you appreciate or found really supportive - whether it be from  a friend, family member or stranger.   Anyone have a good story?

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I know there are plenty of times when people just don't get it and say and do the wrong thing concerning reactions to your diabetes...but I would love to hear what things you appreciate or found really supportive - whether it be from  a friend, family member or stranger.   Anyone have a good story?

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The best thing for me is my daughter, she tells me all the time I am a much better with diabetes. Let's just say my past was not so good. LOL  I now no longer worry about a back slide, because now the other choice is to die. (not being mean or crude just true LOL)

 

When I was a senior in high school, I had an Advanced Placement English class. The summer before school started I was really sick in the hospital and didn't think I would be able to make it through the year. Well, my teacher wouldn't let me quit. There were many times I wanted to give up and just forget about trying, but my teacher kept pushing me. Well, when our final project was due he told me to do the best I can. And I said, "I'll do it for you." And he said "Don't do it for me, do it for you."

At my Honors Ceremony he came up on the stage to present an award. He gave a little speech and called me up on stage. I had no idea what he was doing. He gave me an award for the Most Improved over the year and before he shook my hand he pointed at me, on stage in front of everyone and said: "Don't do it for me, do it for you. Always, do it for yourself." Instead of a handshake I got a hug. I walked off the stage crying. And I realized that is exactly what I need to do. He helped me make it through my senior year and he never let my diabetes stop me from anything. Even when I wanted to just throw in the towel. He kept me going.

I started college this year and one of my first papers was about something that we live by; something that keeps us going. I wrote about doing things for myself, not for everyone else.

He made me realize that doing things for other people is what I am good at, but sometimes doing something for myself is the best thing...

When my son was first diagnosed, we received a lot of support from our friends.  We know another family whose son also has type 1, and they were a wonderful sounding board for our questions, fears, etc.  It is wonderful to have someone to talk to who really understands (although everyone else around us gets bored to tears when we really get into a conversation!). 

Another thing that really touched my heart was when another friend's 13-year old daughter made us a notebook of all the nutritional information she could find for the restaurants close to us.  We go out to dinner with them a lot, and she must not have wanted that to stop!  She acted like it was no big deal, but what a great and thoughtful gift.  We still bring that with us when going someplace new to use as a comparison for counting carbs. 

I use to babysit for a family of five and one summer we had all these plans to do things. One of the girls was only 7 years old and she made me a "special bag" so that I would have something to carry all my pump supplies it. It was water proof and she decorated it with all the things I like. (We went to the water park a lot)

All the kids were always into my diabetes and they would push the buttons for me when I needed insulin and help me test my sugar. They would put the test strips in and stuff. It was always something that made my day.

But the book that girl made reminded me of that. :) Kids are amazing.

One time i was a bad noodle and i went into DKA. It was REALLY bad and i was in the hospital for a couple of days i think like 4. and my friends came to the hospital one day, and brought me flowers and a card and spent all day with me since my mom was busy, since i was a mess they were helping me fix my hair and stuff. they are my best friends and i love them (i still have the "it's a boy" ballon on a stick they gave me :]) i love them they are my sisters

I think my teen would say that the before diabetes and after d.She was treated no different by her friends :)

My sister-in-law took it upon herself to learn how to give Emmie her shots because she did not want to "miss any part" of her life.  She took this as another thing about Emmie, no big deal.  I really appreciated it and it just bonded them closer.  She has 2 kids of her own, is a teacher and a grad student but she took the time and it has made a differance because Emmie can still continue to spend the night there, one less thing in her life interupted by d.

Thanks for posting this, these are fun to read.

-Meg (Emmies mom, diagnosed 10/29/09 at age 4)