Nite time low fixer

My little girl gets very upset with me when i'm sitting her up telling her she is low and needs to drink some juice or eat something. SO!!! I've made a very easy simple solution to this problem. 2 tablespoons of powered sugar and one 8th cup of hot water. 2tbls of power, 1/8 hot water. Just turn on the tap with hot water, measure the p.sugar into a small glass, pour in the hot water and mix until completely mixed. It's a quick easy small shot of a kung fu power punch of sugar with at least 15 grams of carbs. Or! 1tbls of corn syrup in a medicine plunger. Dripple a little on the lips until they taste it then wake em up and give the rest. I'm very scared of put anything into my daughters mouth while she sleeps, liquid or not. I know these things are horrible things to eat, but ya know what sometimes ya gotta do what works best and a severe low is way worst than sugar water or corn syrup.

My bf gets worried about trying to give me anything during a night time low, he's afraid i'll choke.  My lows always seem to have a worse effect when they begin in my sleep, and it's a lot harder for me to come around to accept some juice.  He's told me that I spit tabs out, and we can't seem to find any glucose gel around here (maybe I should search online).  I was telling a woman at work about this.  Her husband has recently been diagnosed with Type 2.  She said that at one of the diabetes workshops they went to, the educator told her that if he goes low in the night, and cannot readily accept juice, to open a packet of granulated sugar and pour the sugar between his cheek and teeth, same place you'd put the glucose gel.  She said the sugar will get absorbed by his mucous membranes, hopefully enough for him to accept juice in 5 - 10 mins, and minimize the risk of choking on a liquid.  We've never tried it, but I thought "Hey, it makes sense..." and couldn't believe I'd never thought of it before.  It's funny how easy it is to overlook the simple, more obvious solutions.

I second the package of sugar.

 

I do that all the time. I had a habit of carrying sugar packets I stole from restaurants in my purse for a while. When I was little and at the pool with my "Big Sister"(from the Big Brothers & Big Sisters program), I went low while swimming, the the lifeguard made me open my mouth and she poured sugar packets under my tongue until I started to feel better.

I've never put it between my cheek and teeth though, always under the tongue...it melts pretty damn fast that way. I've eaten a spoonful of sugar before(most recently yesterday morning) when there's no other sugar around, but have found if I don't pour it under my tongue, it takes longer to melt so I'd assume it's the same for the cheek and teeth..

 

personally, the idea of someone putting sugar in my mouth when i'm so low i won't wake up, terrifies me. i'd hope they either wake me up enough that i can swallow even if i'm not aware of what's going on or call 911.

[quote user="Sue"]

My bf gets worried about trying to give me anything during a night time low, he's afraid i'll choke.  My lows always seem to have a worse effect when they begin in my sleep, and it's a lot harder for me to come around to accept some juice.  He's told me that I spit tabs out, and we can't seem to find any glucose gel around here (maybe I should search online).  I was telling a woman at work about this.  Her husband has recently been diagnosed with Type 2.  She said that at one of the diabetes workshops they went to, the educator told her that if he goes low in the night, and cannot readily accept juice, to open a packet of granulated sugar and pour the sugar between his cheek and teeth, same place you'd put the glucose gel.  She said the sugar will get absorbed by his mucous membranes, hopefully enough for him to accept juice in 5 - 10 mins, and minimize the risk of choking on a liquid.  We've never tried it, but I thought "Hey, it makes sense..." and couldn't believe I'd never thought of it before.  It's funny how easy it is to overlook the simple, more obvious solutions.

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I had a overnight low one night bcuz right before going to sleep my sugar was over 500 after eating so I walked a mile or more on the treadmill after putting myself a insulin shot. My blood sugar was normal after that but I didnt realize that it was going to keep dropping while I slept so at 4am my guy noticed something was wrong and he tried to wake me up and I opened my eyes but wasnt reacting to anything like if I was brain dead and then I started having a seizure. He said I was shaking and he tried to give me orange juice but my mouth wouldnt open so he gave me sugar in between my cheeks and my teeth just like you mentioned. He honestly had no idea what to do and that was the only thing he could think of bcuz I've never been that low ever in the15 years that I've been diabetic. The paramedics showed up at my house and by the time they arrived I had woken up. I had no idea what had happened, I dont remember anything. Your post reminded me so much of this night which happened one month ago. I've seen different diabetes educators growing up and I dont remember anyone ever saying that, maybe I ignored it who knows so that's really good you shared that! :-) Everyone should tell people close to them just in case it ever happens, it's very scary.

Hi Karen,

Hypoglycemic seizures are no fun for anyone.  I've had quite a few, and usually in hindsight, I can see what I could/should have done to prevent it.  Hindsight is 20/20.  That's awesome that he thought to give you the sugar, I'm glad it worked.  My bf's had to call the paramedics on several occasions (diabetic 17 yrs, we've been together for 14 of them), and I know it must be so frightening for him to await their arrival while I'm convulsing.  I have to say over the years I've taken sub-optimal care of my diabetes, and the last night time low/seizure was what has really prompted me to get a hold of all this.  His description of the events scared the crap out of me, and I realise how unfair it is to casually allow him to be put into such a position.  I know now that he'll try the sugar routine, even if he's already called them, to see if he can get me out of the siezure mode as soon as possible.  Hopefully now that I'm checking my blood sugar up to 8 times a day, monitoring my diet and doing everything I can on my end, he won't have to call anyone anytime soon. 

People always say... "Ohhh, you were seizing??? That must have been SO scary!"  to which I remind them that it's not scary for me, I'm unconcious... it's Keith that has to watch someone he loves in such a position, that must be far scarier.

 

Batts, I totally agree that if someone is not responding there is certainly risk involved with putting ANYTHING in their mouth.  That's why I say "When in doubt, call 911."

Ain't this disease fun!  Uh, that was sarcasm if you thought I was serious.

My doctor told my parents that if I went low during the night and I won't wake up quickly to take some cake icing and put it in my jaw between my teeth and cheek. That it would dissolve. It's worked so far.

That sounds like another good one Brittany.  Mmmmmm..... cake icing =)~

Yeah. Haha. One time my parents gave me some blue cake icing and I woke up with blue teeth and a blue tongue. I thought something was wrong with me.

LOL!

GLUCAGON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Why doesn't everyone have thier partner trained how to use the little red box of salvation! It works so fast and saves your brain from possible damage. Twice i've had to give my five yr old glucagon and i'm here to tell you it works! If my daughter would have seized the entire time it took the ems to arrive I would have gone insane, seriously, what we went through left lasting cracks, I could't go through more.

Glucagon is great, but has such a short shelf life.  The paramedics game me an IV of it once when I was totally gone.  After that I got the little red box you refer to, but it was only good for about 6 months.  And it can be expensive.  It's good to have just in case.  I remember it took me a few months to get my brain back to total function after the episode with the paramedics.  Insulin shock certainly effected my brain but for me, it did recover, but it took time.  My short term memory was awful for a few months.  It scared me because my father died from Alzheimers.