Parents Face Unique Challenge: Three Kids With Type 1

We ran this article this morning. Its a really odd case -- two non-diabetic parents with three Type 1 kids. Has anyone heard of any other cases like this?

Parents Face Unique Challenge: Three Kids With Type 1

OTHER HEADLINES FROM DIABETES NEWS HOUND

Understanding How Diabetes Impacts Your Spouse

Calif. Court Nixes Deal Involving Diabetic Students

There is a blog posted by "Thousand" who has 3 kids with diabetes.

here's the blog: http://juvenation.org/blogs/thousand/archive/2010/06/04/3-out-of-3.aspx <-- this family is from michigan.

That was my first thought, too, Angela.  It has to be the same person - I mean, what are the odds?  When I read her blog post (I think it was a blog...), I read it to my husband and we just looked at each other, like:  "Hooooooly crap.  How does that even work?  What if they're all low at the same time?  What if you get their doses messed up?  THAT'S A LOT OF OVERNIGHT FINGER STICKS!"  My heart goes out to that family (both, if it turns out to be two seperate families.  I noticed the names are not the same.). 

I cannot even begin to imagine what daily life is like for these families....We are raising two girls, who are perfectly healthy (thank goodness) and some days are tricky enough!!!  I really admire these families.

I personally know four families with three kids with type 1 - Utah, Wisconsin, Florida and Michigan (who actually has moved to... S.C. recently?).  I guess after reading this, I know five, since there is a Michigan family on Juvenation with three as above blog post shows.    Only one of those had a parent with type 1.    It happens but is not common. 

If someone out there has three kids diagnosed, and needs some support, let me know.  I can get you in touch with one of these other families.

I'm sorry to change the topic, but what did you all think about that 3rd article on the Calif. court decision? In some ways, it's good to have others allowed to give insulin, like if the nurse is away or something. But, on the other hand, I wouldn't want the latest student teacher giving my child his/her insulin. I guess I couldn't decide how I felt and was interested to hear other comments...

This is so unlikely to happen. Even when both parents are type 1, there is only a 50% chance their child will be  type 1. There would be only a 12.5% chance they would have 3 children with type 1. If neither parent had type 1 it is inconceivable they would have 3 children with type 1, unless there was some reason other than genetics involved. I am thinking all three children were exposed to something thatcaused sufficient pancreas damage and type 1 resulted. For instance, there is a doctor in Maryland who has researched the effect of immunizations among young children. He maintains that there are many cases of type 1 when several immunizations are given within a short span of time. If three siblings were all exposed to a series of injections in the same time frame, of short duration, then all three becoming type 1 is more understandable.

My heart goes out to these children and their parents. I hope they know about the CWD diabetes site.

[quote user="Richard Vaughn"]

This is so unlikely to happen. Even when both parents are type 1, there is only a 50% chance their child will be  type 1.

[/quote]

is it really 50%? i always thought (hoped) it was much lower than that.

That sounds a bit high to me, but I don't have the exact data for when both parents have T1. Here is the stats we have from a past article of Diabetes News Hound: Children of men with Type 1 diabetes have a 6% chance of developing diabetes. With women, the risks vary. A child born to a woman with Type 1 diabetes, who is younger than 25 years old, has a 4% chance of getting diabetes. After that age, the risk drops to 1%. The odds double if the parent was diagnosed prior to the age of 11 years old. Children of non-diabetic parents have less than a 1% chance of getting this form of the disease.

According to the American Diabetes Association website http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html , which is where this quote is from:

In general, if you are a man with type 1 diabetes, the odds of your child getting diabetes are 1 in 17. If you are a woman with type 1 diabetes and your child was born before you were 25, your child's risk is 1 in 25; if your child was born after you turned 25, your child's risk is 1 in 100.

Your child's risk is doubled if you developed diabetes before age 11. If both you and your partner have type 1 diabetes, the risk is between 1 in 10 and 1 in 4.

There is an exception to these numbers. About 1 in every 7 people with type 1 diabetes has a condition called type 2 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome.

In addition to having diabetes, these people also have thyroid disease and a poorly working adrenal gland. Some also have other immune system disorders. If you have this syndrome, your child's risk of getting the syndrome including type 1 diabetes is 1 in 2.

 

thanks! :o)

[quote user="Sarah"]

I'm sorry to change the topic, but what did you all think about that 3rd article on the Calif. court decision? In some ways, it's good to have others allowed to give insulin, like if the nurse is away or something. But, on the other hand, I wouldn't want the latest student teacher giving my child his/her insulin. I guess I couldn't decide how I felt and was interested to hear other comments...

[/quote]

 

in my opinion, because it said "trained personnel" and not just "any personnel" i would feel comfortable leaving my d-child with them, assuming i felt the training was sufficient. drawing up insulin and giving a shot really isn't all that difficult - someone else can even check the dosages for accuracy. poking my kid's finger is even more simple... someone would have a hard time screwing that one up. i can understand the desire to have doctors/nurses being the one administering the shots & pokes, but i feel if someone is sufficiently/correctly trained it wouldn't be a big deal.

no, only an RN or someone actually smart enugh... im not kidding there are really STUPID "trained personal" 

One time when i was younger they had a day where the nurse couldn't come, and this trained personal person came, and after lunch was over i vomited, and then she was like oh does this happen to you everyday? you probably lost ur medicine, i'll give u another shot.. i was like no. and called my mom asap. 

The more I read about families with multiple t-1 dx'es the more I think these stats are out dated or something. I know hard it is to have 3 kids one with t-1 two with autism and epilepsy and I get mixed up. Last night it was time to give my son his meds and I got Rileys insulin ready oi she laughed at me tho heck I laughed at me. I couldnt imagine having them all be t-1.

[quote user="Sarah"]

I'm sorry to change the topic, but what did you all think about that 3rd article on the Calif. court decision? In some ways, it's good to have others allowed to give insulin, like if the nurse is away or something. But, on the other hand, I wouldn't want the latest student teacher giving my child his/her insulin. I guess I couldn't decide how I felt and was interested to hear other comments...

[/quote]

Here they are aloud to BUT they are suppose to call the parents for dosing. Which imo is a good thing. I wouldnt mind someone doing it for my child other than the school nurse. Heck there are two other people I trust more than the school nurse. One teacher is a t-1 mom and the media specialist is a t-1 wife. I cant wait for our next meeting because everything will change. Right now she keeps her meter in the office. I want her to carry it with her and have insulin in the classroom or with her at all times. They had a practice lock down and it made me think they are stuck in their rooms. They are not aloud to let anybody in them. Even someone with a district 60 nurses badge. So yeah things will change next year.

We are like that on a slightly smaller scale.  My mother and father are non-diabetic and have two children together.  We are both type 1s.  I was diagnosed in '98 and my brother was diagnosed in 2006.  Our endo at the time told us that was still pretty rare.

[quote user="Jessica "]

[One teacher is a t-1 mom and the media specialist is a t-1 wife.

[/quote]

OMG, I would train the Ti mom to do her insulin any day if that were allowed!

When I worked briefly in a elementary public school (hated the bureaucracy and quit after 3 months) there were twin boys both w/ T1 in the school. I offered to help if anyone ever needed me. Their teachers were thrilled to have someone else around -- not as their official caregiver, but just in an emergency (e.g., another Mom just brought in pretzels as a snack -- do they have carbs, so should I have the nurse come?). But, the school nurse didn't want to anywhere near them to help, not b/c of regulations but b/c I was "stepping on her toes." I didn't push it but sometimes felt sad that a lady with limited training wasn't able to use me as an occasional resource. I mean, it's not like I was GIVING insulin, I was just there to say if something was "off" and the parents or nurse should be contacted... Oh well, one of the many reasons being in that job was too political for me!!

There is another blog by a mother of 4, and 3 of the 4 have type 1.  Her name is Meri and here is a link to her blog.  (Great blog too!)

http://ourdiabeticlife.blogspot.com/

Shanno

holy a site change everyday?! how do they afford that? I couldn't imagine having to waste $20/day on a site change, let alone doing it for 3 kids!