Should I just let this go?

My son, Jake, is 11. For the most part, we've had really good experiences when it comes to school. The nurses have been supportive and until now, all of the teachers have been too. This year, he is in 6th grade and has started rotating between classrooms. He carries his bag (test kit, juice, etc) with him to each class. He has a team of 4 teachers and most of them have been very cooperative. I just found out last week that one of his teachers makes him go across the hall into a supply closet to check his BG if he's feeling low. The supply closet is a decent- sized, relatively clean room with a fridge, microwave, and a phone. It's not some tiny, dirty place with mops and brooms. They even allow him to keep extra juices, granola bars, etc. in there to save him a trip to the nurse's office. So, it's not the fact that it's a supply closet that bugs me. He goes alone when he has to test, but it's right across the hall and one of the teachers always keeps her door open. So, it's not the alone part that bugs me. The part that bugs me is the reason why he has to leave is that his testing is distractive to the other students. I feel like that is the teacher's and other student's problem, and NOT Jake's. How distracting can a 30 second BG check be? He's allowed to come back to class with juice or glucose tablets in hand, so he's not missing much class. If she kept him out until his BG came back up, I'd raise holy heck. He's only missing a few minutes of class and it's certainly not an everyday occurrence. So my question...should I just let this go or should I raise the fact that she is basically discriminating against Jake because she can't keep her class's attention? I don't want to rock the boat too much, as we have things pretty good for the most part...but it just doesn't seem right.

you need to talk to them there is a law for our kids its call the 504 plan where i live and he should never go alone anything could happen look in to the law they have to go by it

I agree, I worry about rocking the boat too much because I don't want to sour mostly good relationships when I know it is extra work for the teachers. (yes, I get that they legally MUST do it, but always better to have people wanting to work with you than feeling forced.) Maybe I would just ask if he can check in the classroom, in the back or at a side table. I'd also just ask more about what the distraction is to the class. Is he waving around his lancet and threatening to poke other kids when he gets out his test kit? ;) (I hope people get that is an attempt at D-humor). I'd just ask more questions of all the teachers - try to find out what the ones that let him test in class do so that it is not disruptive before raising the issue to the one that is making him go across the hall. But just be tactful.

 

Hello Sandi,  I would talk to the teacher!  I've taught my son right from the start to never feel ashamed to check his BG and do his insulin shots in front of others.  The teachers never asked him to go somewhere else to check himself.  He has started High School this year and I specifically asked the teachers not to send him out of class if he needed to check himself!!!  I told them that it only took a second to do his stuff and that I didn't want him to miss the given lesson.  And, I think it is more disturbing to others if they get out of class and than get back in class.  Our kids know to do there stuff without disburbing others!  They already have to live with this every day, they don't need to be discriminated especially within his friends.  Good Luck!

Sandi, 

First, before asking teachers nurses ect, ask your son what he wants. He might feel more comfortable going to the other room. I know I felt uncomfortable eating snacks in school around people who couldn't eat. Figure out how he feels about it, then you can decide whether it is prudent to rock the boat or not.

 

Dan

I agree with all the previous posts! If your son feels better remaining in the classroom to test (or if you really don't want him walking across the hall alone), I like the idea of kindly talking to the teacher and hope she understands. Hopefully, it won't have to become a big deal with the principal, etc. (BTW, does he have a 504 plan that you could refer to?) As well as not wanting him to feel that his D is something to hide or be ashamed of, it really worries me that he'd need to miss class even if its for a minute. What if that's the minute the teacher reviews a question that will be on the test? Not fair!!

Thanks for all the comments and advice.  It's great to have people to talk to that "get" what I'm asking!  We haven't put a 504 in place because we haven't seemed to need it.  They say the time to do a 504  is before you need one though, so I know we need to get moving.  I like the idea of talking to Jake to see what his thoughts are.  We are moving more and more toward his independence, so he should have some say in this.  I also mentioned something to the nurse to get her thoughts.  Thanks again!

 

I turned the sound off on my daughter's meter and that helped her not feel self conscious testing in class. Getting up and walking out

sure must be more of a distraction. Maybe you can try silencing the meter too.

I think getting up and walking out of class would be more of a distraction than taking out a meter that probably takes 5 seconds to produce a number.  I also think it's a good idea to ask your son whether walking out of class to test or testing in class is more comfortable for him.  What would worry me is if he put off leaving class to test, for example, during an exam, while learning something particularly difficult, or while the whole class was being reprimanded by the teacher.  Think about it, those would be really awkward times to try to leave, but are also particularly stressful times, and we all know stress has a huge impact on blood sugar and effects different people in different ways.  I was a shy kid (not sure if your son is or not) and I just know that I would be worrying whether it was the "right" time to leave the classroom.  Not to mention that low blood sugar can cause confusion. 

Also, sometimes I test my blood sugar and I'm fine, then a half an hour later I feel a little weird and test again and I realize I've been dropping.  Would he feel weird leaving the room to test, and then leaving again in a half an hour?  Would the teacher have a problem with that?  Because testing at his desk is obviously more discrete.  I know it's a hypothetical situation, but it could happen.

Keep in mind that I went to a very oppressive private school, so my concerns about the teacher not letting him leave class frequently are based on my experiences and (hopefully!) don't apply!

Molly

Update on this...just because I'm proud of my son!  While I was deciding how/when to bring this up delicately with the teacher (wait for parent-teacher conference time, email, etc.), Jake decided to ignore the rule and started testing in class on his own. I'm proud of him for standing up for himself!  I did send an email to the teacher to explain why he was breaking the rules, as he is not normally a trouble maker.   Everything is settled now.  :)

awesome! good for him :)

[quote user="Sandi"]

Update on this...just because I'm proud of my son!  While I was deciding how/when to bring this up delicately with the teacher (wait for parent-teacher conference time, email, etc.), Jake decided to ignore the rule and started testing in class on his own. I'm proud of him for standing up for himself!  I did send an email to the teacher to explain why he was breaking the rules, as he is not normally a trouble maker.   Everything is settled now.  :)

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AWESOME!! I love that he took the initiative and decided he isn't going to let other people control the way he controls his diabetes. 

[quote user="Sandi"]

Update on this...just because I'm proud of my son!  While I was deciding how/when to bring this up delicately with the teacher (wait for parent-teacher conference time, email, etc.), Jake decided to ignore the rule and started testing in class on his own. I'm proud of him for standing up for himself!  I did send an email to the teacher to explain why he was breaking the rules, as he is not normally a trouble maker.   Everything is settled now.  :)

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NICE! I am proud of him too and my daughter every time someone tries to stomp on her rights and she stands up for herself.

Sandi,

Good for your son! My 6th grader has always had a 504 plan but has to ALWAYS go to the nurses office to check his b/s. If he is feeling low he will eat skittles and a buddy will walk him to the nurse. He is not allowed to carry his test kit or insulin pen with him as all supplies remain in the nurses office. I wonder if this is just our state law? It is the same for High School. It is so important to play nice with the nurse and teachers because it really does make the child's school experience so much easier!

That's just horrible! I have to leave my club at school to test my blood sugar cause apparently they don't like blood. I'm the youngest one there, and I feel like telling the rest of the club and the teacher to grow up! The ironic part?

It's the unity club.

I could almost laugh.

Almost.

Anyway, this is not right and your child should get to test in class! Would they make a child with asthma leave to take and inhaler? No, because this would be dangerous, and your situation is no different. Talk to the teacher, swap teachers, do whatever you need to do. This is just not right, and someone should set that teacher straight.

Sorry if I come off as a bit of a hothead. I'm really not, it's just this one issue that really gets to me.