Sick of diabetic mice

Since 1994 when I was diagnosed, a big breakthrough in type 1 would come out every few years how they cured mice with type 1. So now there are roughly 30 different cures if you are a type 1 mouse.

lol

And people are confused when I don’t support the research teams. I don’t know what they’re doing with all the money but I’m sure the mice appreciate it a lot.

Oh yeah, and I’m also sick of people getting excited and telling me about some new pill that eliminates symptoms… in type 2.

How do you think they developed all the treatments we have? My life on NPH sucked. I have so much more flexibility now that I’m on Lantus. And even on NPH my life was so much better than if I’d been diagnosed 10 or 20 years earlier. Lantus isn’t a cure, but it’s a treatment that has improved my life tenfold and I owe that to the research teams and all the diabetic mice, rats, pigs, dogs, etc. that they worked with. Did you know that the first diabetic to survive (with the help of insulin therapy) was a dog named Marjorie?

It can take decades for a new medical treatment to reach the human clinical trial phase, if it ever does at all. Researchers start with mice because they’re relatively cheap (easy to produce in large quantities and easy to take care of) and most people don’t care much if labs kill millions of mice every year (as opposed to dogs, pigs, or primates for example). Once a treatment shows promise in mice they move on to a species more similar to humans (again, like dogs, pigs, or primates). It’s only after those trials that the FDA will allow them to start testing in humans. And each individual study can last from a few weeks to a few years.

we would be better off if some of that BIG pile of money going to pay the big salaries of university researchers and drug companies was diverted to giving people that need it; test strips, insulin, regular check ups, pumps, whatever they need to take care of themselves without the huge hassle it takes to get those things when you don’t have the big salary of a university researcher

How do you think they developed all the treatments we have? My life on NPH sucked. I have so much more flexibility now that I’m on Lantus. And even on NPH my life was so much better than if I’d been diagnosed 10 or 20 years earlier. Lantus isn’t a cure, but it’s a treatment that has improved my life tenfold and I owe that to the research teams and all the diabetic mice, rats, pigs, dogs, etc. that they worked with. Did you know that the first diabetic to survive (with the help of insulin therapy) was a dog named Marjorie?

It can take decades for a new medical treatment to reach the human clinical trial phase, if it ever does at all. Researchers start with mice because they’re relatively cheap (easy to produce in large quantities and easy to take care of) and most people don’t care much if labs kill millions of mice every year (as opposed to dogs, pigs, or primates for example). Once a treatment shows promise in mice they move on to a species more similar to humans (again, like dogs, pigs, or primates). It’s only after those trials that the FDA will allow them to start testing in humans. And each individual study can last from a few weeks to a few years.


:slight_smile: I was not serious. By the way, I am unsure if there has actually been a cure for anything in humans. Vaccinations and prevention but not too sure about a defined cure for any disease. I could be wrong though, I am just going off the top of my head.
Oh yeah, and I’m also sick of people getting excited and telling me about some new pill that eliminates symptoms… in type 2.
haha I actually laughed out loud here. When I was younger and the first few times this happened I would get a bit excited inside thinking what if. Now I am conditioned to automatically say "That is for type 2". Even if they actually cured it I would still most likely just assume it was for type 2.
we would be better off if some of that BIG pile of money going to pay the big salaries of university researchers and drug companies was diverted to giving people that need it; test strips, insulin, regular check ups, pumps, whatever they need to take care of themselves without the huge hassle it takes to get those things when you don’t have the big salary of a university researcher
I went 10 years without health ins before paying everything out of pocket so I know this all to well. I don't mind money going to research but I still can not figure out how a One Touch testing strip on average costs $1.49/ea and a vial of insulin is $320 to $340 all of a sudden. :) Actually I can, but that would be "crazy conspiracy" talk.

ZeroOpoint,

I like your sense of humor. I actually had to keep myself from LOL just now after reading your comments. I would have laughed out loud had I not been sleeping next to my daughter who we just had to wake at 0400 hours because she had a low. Even with a CGM, we are constantly on watch in case our daughter gets low at night. As much as it sucks, we still can’t lose our sense of humor.

Thanks for the laugh and different perspective on living with T1D. What we dislike mostly, as parents of a child with T1D, are the many “experts” we run into who try to tell us how a good diet will cure our daughter of T1D…:roll_eyes:

There sure is a lot of ignorance out there about diabetes. Yikes!

Take care

Dave