Softball and T1D

My 12 year old daughter was diagnosed in February 2019. She plays softball on a travel team so practice &/or games 4-5 days a week. She’s a pitcher and plays 2nd base. She currently has a Dexcom G6 she wears on her arms to avoid ripping it out when sliding and diving. Thinking about getting a pump but worried about placement. Does anyone have advice about which type of pump would work for her and where she could place it so it wouldn’t come out with sliding and diving?

I haven’t played contact sports in a while, but when working out I clip my Tandem T-Slim to the waistband of my panties or tuck it in my cleavage (maybe when she’s older :blush::scream::kissing_heart:); and some women clip it to their bra, under the arm, although that might not be comfortable.
As far as protection from damage by getting hit by a ball, Minimed had a sports guard for their pump many years ago. Something like that might help of they still sell them, although it’s big and bulky and there’s no way to hide it.
While you are considering pump therapy, some athletes prefer injections - swimmers don’t want the big bulky sports guard showing them down, divers probably don’t want to keep disconnecting every time they get ready to dive… While pumping is considered the best treatment, some do well on injections.
Wishing you the best in finding what works for your daughter.

@AliG Welcome Alison to the TypeOneNation Forum!

I hope that your daughter, and you too, are getting a fairly good hold on the many variables when living with diabetes - learning never stops. Really good that your daughter is active and from what you write is not being held back “just because of” the fact that she is living with diabetes.

What I do when active and wearing a device [pump infusion set or CGM monitor] on my arm is to slip a “tube bandage” or section of stocking over the site to give a bit of protection and smooth out possible areas that might catch onto clothing or other objects. My baseball days were over 50 years before good CGM were available and back them I only had syringe and needle.

As far as pumps, several major league players use pumps - I’ve met one with a Medtronic and one with a Tandem and both clip the pump to their belt right in the center of their back. Last year a video of an outfielder “texting while playing” went viral - when he was later interviewed, he made clear that he was not texting but rather suspending his insulin flow. I have clipped or tucked my various pumps I never used OmniPod tubeless] just about everywhere and not had problems. During surgeries, and other times of high activity, I have used a fabric belt with a pouch wrapped around me into which I’ve kept my pump operating and the tubing confined so the infusion site isn’t disturbed.
There is a “caution” in the Tandem t-Slim user manual saying that the face / screen of the pump should not be placed against the skin. Cheers for you daughter!

I have a 12 year old daughter diagnosed September 2018 who has the Omnipod Dash and Dexcom G6. She is very active with dance and after much research I chose the Omnipod because it’s tubeless. She’s been on the pump almost a year and I think the Omnipod was the right choice for her. The Tandem Tslim is more tech advanced but I think for my daughter’s age and activity, tubeless was more important. Not having to wear the pump during activity is huge. And it’s been much easier for her moving pump sites without having to worry about the tubes. She usually wears her Dex on her arms and her pump on her butt, lower back, and legs. As far as site placement for your daughter, I think stomach, lower back, butt, and legs could work for softball (my son pitches and plays 2nd base too). Use the opposite side from where she’s sliding. You can also get adhesive patches for the Omnipod (like for the Dex) for additional security.