Surgery and Pumping

I'm new to this forum and will be having an outpatient surgery on my hip in a few weeks (hip arthroscopy).  I have type 1 and wear an insulin pump.  I also tend to be sensitive to insulin -- for example, when I have nausea/vomiting and can't eat, I need to significantly reduce and/or turn off my basals to avoid going low. 

I would appreciate hearing from anyone who has had minor surgery about how they handled the pump.  Did you disconnect during surgery?  Reduce your basals?  Did the hospital monitor your blood sugars during surgery?  

Thanks in advance.  

I have had a colonoscopy while pumping, and I was allowed to use my pump while they monitored my blood sugar during the entire procedure. My doctor verified that my control was good, and I should be safe while using my pump. If your doctor will do the same, then you should be able to depend on your pump during surgery. If, however, your sensitivity to insulin and your control results in frequent lows, then you probably should not use the pump at that time. Even the anxiety caused by surgery can make some diabetics have unstable blood sugar. If you disconnect your pump and let them monitor during the surgery, they can give you glucose as needed to keep you from going low. I was permitted to use my pump ONLY because my pump control is very stable and the colonoscopy did not cause me any concern at all.

I've had a few surgerys while i was on the pump. All of them I kept my pump on and didn't make any changes. While I was under anesthesia the doctors monitored me and checked my blood sugars frequently and all went well. If you know you have a tendency of running on the low side i would lower your basal rates and just let the doctor know. Also let them know what kind of insulin your taking and your correction if anything needs to be changed while your getting your surgery.

I had arthroscopic shoulder surgery in November.  I kept my pump on but reduced my basal rate (I also made sure the surgery scheduler knew I had type 1 and needed the 1st appt of the day (since you can't eat, etc for 12 hours before)).  So I reduced my basal rate before we left the house in the morning.   My endo wanted me to try to be around 150 before going into surgery.  The anesthesiologist kept my dexcom CGM receiver in his pocket while I was under - they LOVED it.  

Talk to your diabetes doctor to get specific plan on how to handle.  

I've had arthroscopic knee and shoulder surgery over the past three years while on the pump.  I offered to reduce the basal rate by 1/2 during the surgery, and the doctors agreed.  As long as your blood sugar just before surgery is in the normal range and not dropping, it should be all right.  I'd carry a few sugar packets and/or juice boxes - just in case your blood sugar begins to trend lower, you can stablize it before the surgery begins.

[quote user="MarkO"]

I've had arthroscopic knee and shoulder surgery over the past three years while on the pump.  I offered to reduce the basal rate by 1/2 during the surgery, and the doctors agreed.  As long as your blood sugar just before surgery is in the normal range and not dropping, it should be all right.  I'd carry a few sugar packets and/or juice boxes - just in case your blood sugar begins to trend lower, you can stablize it before the surgery begins.

[/quote]

I agree that most doctors recommend a 50% basal for times you aren't eating (like surgery), although you should check w/ your endo about your own situation. But, I wanted to add that most anesthesiologists don't want you drinking juice before surgery. So, if you're low, check about what they want you to do (clear juice, dextrose drip, postpone surgery, or whatever....).