Transmitter expiration

Hello everyone,
I have a question. So my sister uses Dexcom g6. Her transmitter is supposed to expire in eight days but the Dexcom app says it’s supposed to expire in three weeks. My sister is also supposed to put on a new sensor today. Should she just activate a new transmitter or try using the old one? My mom wanted to get feedback from you guys and see if anyone has dealt with this before. :slight_smile:

Thank you!

Hi @arodric5002 it would help us understand why you are saying the transmitter is supposed to expire in 8 days? The transmitter counts down from the day you first started a sensor.

Hello, @joe
She put on the transmitter on February 28. 90 days from February 28 is May 28. Which is in about a week. That’s why we don’t know what to do. The 90 day period ends on May 28 however Dexcom says it’s supposed to last us for another three weeks.

Here’s some info straight from Dexcom’s site.
https://www.dexcom.com/faqs/how-long-does-dexcom-g6-transmitter-last

I had a sensor going when my transmitter expired😖 and Dexcom sent me a replacement.
FYI, budget allowing sometimes I buy a box of infusion sets, sensors or a transmitter on Amazon or eBay just in case - of course I check the expiration date and make sure the box pictured in the listing does not appear to have been tapered with.
You’re not supposed to do that online and I leave it to your discretion. Much as I dislike it, It’s saved me if from the (albeit very rare) delays and gives me peace of mind.
However, as I said before, Dexcom should replace it.

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Alexa @arodric5002 , dexcom guarantees the transmitter to last AT LEAST 90 days, however they usually work well for at least 112 days. The Dexcom receiver and Dexcom app monitor battery strength and will notify you at least 2 to 3 weeks before the transmitter expires. MARK that Dat on your calendar and plan to begin a new transmitter when starting a new sensor within 10 days of that ex date

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Hi!
Thank you so much for your feedback and thanks for taking the time to let me know about your experience and that Dexcom link. Super helpful! However, as far as I know Dexcom only replaces the transmitter if it expires before the 90 days. I am not sure if they would replace the transmitter if it fails on us for using it past the 90 days. I hope I’m not confusing. :slight_smile:

Hello,
Thank you for the information. My sisters only been on Dexcom for less than a year and we were told to always replace the transmitter every 90 days. I had no idea that it could last longer than that!

no they wouldn’t replace the transmitter if it fails on the 97th or so day, but they would replace the transmitter if it fails before minimum 90 days and they should replace a sensor if the app told you it was ok to start a session but the transmitter didn’t live to the end.

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Apologies - I am the one who was unclear: it was the sensor they replaced because there were a few days left on it when the transmitter battery died.

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The transmitter won’t fail. It is smart technology. When replacing the sensor, if the transmitter won’t last another 10 days, it’ll force you to replace it.

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Hello,
Thank you so much! That really helped

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No need to apologize. Thanks for the clarification!

Thank you!! Supper helpful!!

Dennis has it correct. The G6 app won’t expire the transmitter until 112 days from first use. The app will start giving you warnings after 90 days. However, when you insert a new sensor, it will tell you then if you are on your last session or not. So while the transmitter will last 112 days, I think it won’t let you put in a new sensor at day 110. I usually go in and order my new transmitter when I get the first warning as I know it will be soon.

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Hello,
Thank you so much for the information. I had no idea that the transmitter could last up to more than 90 days. I thought that once 90 days had passed you had to replace it. Super helpful!

I always wait for the transmitter to tell me it is going to expire in a week and then if I do not have another one at hand I call and they usually ship it out next day. If your Dexcom has not given you the warning saying that it will expire in a week you should be fine. Worst case scenario is you wait to get that expiration warning and then call, as I have done, and they should overnight one to you and you will still have several days before it actually expires. That has, at least, been my experience. I hope everything works out okay. You do have a glucometer at hand if you need one, correct?

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I get my CGM (and pump) supplies by mail and have auto ship set - orders typically ship so I get while I still have a week or so left and transmitter should go out to receive before the 90 day expiration.
One tip: I look at transmitter expiration like I do projected delivery dates - it’ll happen around that time, and it could be later. Although it’s not supposed to let you start a new sensor if the transmitter will run out, that’s not always been the case for me. So I use my transmitter until it does run out and call for a new sensor if the transmitter battery ends out before the sensor finishes.
I’ve bought some extra transmitter time but will get my replacement on the same schedule.
Also - kudos to those who have leftover supplies after doing an upgrade. Call me selfish of you want but if I have old ones when the new ones come in I finish off the old first. I like to stay ahead of the game.

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Hello,
Thank you so much for sharing your experience. We always have extra supplies on hand. For example we always have an extra sensor, transmitter and a glucose meter! It’s good to be prepared in case things fail. For my young sister it’s hard for her to constantly be poking her finger so we always make sure to have extra sensors on hand in case one fails.

Thank you!

You are very wise to have the extras available in case of emergency. Insurance companies can sometimes take issue with that and will only allow prescriptions to be refilled in accordance with a schedule they themselves have approved (not necessarily with adequate medical and scientific support). My insurance would not, sadly, allow me to have a backup transmitter as they are too expensive. With respect to the finger sticks, I do understand that it can be problematic. As a cellist, when I was much younger, my finger sticks would become an issue every now and then but there was no choice back then. It might makes sense to have the glucometer on had just for emergencies though? It would be another backup which is consistent with your lauded caution in having backups of all supplies. We must each find our own way to manage type I diabetes in a way that works for us (while remaining open to new ideas and technologies, naturally). You and your family are doing an excellent job. I hope you are able to get the transmitter. Worst case, if the alarm comes on saying the transmitter will expire in a week or two, I am sure they will overnight you another. Be well!

Hello,
We are indeed very lucky to be able to have backups. Thanks to our prescription we are allowed to get sensors every month and a transmitter every three months. Unfortunately though we do have to pay the full price for mostly everything except the insulin because the insurance doesn’t cover because of being “out of the network” and such. It’s honestly so terrible that supplies are so expensive. Anyways, thank you so much and you stay safe!