Why so serious?

Besides mentoring with younger, newly-diagnosed diabetics, I don't really hang out or associate with other diabetics. That is why I joined this website... to get to know more people in my situation. I was kind of thirsty for a change of perspective. However, as I read posts and blogs and talk to other people on here, I can't help but notice how melancholy a lot of you guys are. And I really just don't understand it.

Maybe it is my attitude or personal situation but I just do not understand why everyone is so upset about having this disease. I remember being 12 and waking up in the PICU after being unconscious for a day and scared to death. I had no idea what was wrong. After my mom told me I was diabetic, I was honestly relieved and, ultimately, thankful.

Here's why. I thought I had cancer and I don't. Millions of people have AIDS and cancer and leukemia and extremely debilitating diseases-- but we don't. Some people cannot walk or talk or see or hear-- but we can. They cannot have children or maybe if they do, they won't see them grow up-- but we can. Some people do not even survive after their first breath...

But we do.

I am not saying diabetes is easy, it takes a lot of work and it can be frustrating and there are some possible complications. But, in the grand scheme of things, I just don't see how it is something worth crying over. Next time you get frustrated and sick of being a diabetic, remember how much worse your life could be. I guarantee you diabetes is not going to be as bad when you realize that.

Just a little bit of perspective.

 

 

i hate it at times..but i'm probably the only diabetic i've met who goes "eh, it could be worse, whatever" when someone says "omg! i'm sorry you have diabetes, that must suck!".

i honestly wasn't raised(dx at 6) to believe that it was the end of the world.

all this talk about "shorter life spans" has never been in my mind either. when people mention that diabetics tend(but don't always) have shorter lives than those who don't and are 100% healthy..i go "oooooh right. i remember some doctor saying that or reading that somewhere...whatever." as far as i'm concerned, i'm gonna live to be 90.

While I don't dismiss the seriousness of the condition, I really like your perspective.  That's the perspective that got me through my son's diagnosis. He was diagnosed exactly one week before my co-worker's 8-year-old died from a brain tumor.  In comparison, diabetes is a cake walk.  I don't underestimate the challenges ahead, and I admire your maturity in putting the issue in perspective.  It's very easy for us to say "why me?" or "why my child?", but at least we know that aside from blood sugar, we're healthy and have every chance of living long productive lives. 

Thank you for helping us all to look at our cup as half full!

[quote user="Ann Marie"]

While I don't dismiss the seriousness of the condition, I really like your perspective.  That's the perspective that got me through my son's diagnosis. He was diagnosed exactly one week before my co-worker's 8-year-old died from a brain tumor.  In comparison, diabetes is a cake walk.  I don't underestimate the challenges ahead, and I admire your maturity in putting the issue in perspective.  It's very easy for us to say "why me?" or "why my child?", but at least we know that aside from blood sugar, we're healthy and have every chance of living long productive lives. 

Thank you for helping us all to look at our cup as half full!

[/quote]

 

You made my day! Thank you so much :)

at least for me, i have days where i'm happy and fine with diabetes and others where i just hate it.

i suppose that when we all have bad days we go on here to look for support that no one else but someone like us could give us

For me as a parent it just sucks because I cant fix it for her but I feel the same way for my boys with their autism and seizures. Plus this is our reality just because it isnt as bad as some people have it doesnt make it suck at times any less for us.

diabetes is a part of my daily routine, and it really can shift priorities in life.  Having said that, I still don't let it get me down.  Even though it's an illness.  Kind of like being sick, in a way, and who really has anything good to say about being sick?   I try to approach it logically, not something I hate, but respect, really.  Also, talking about it and dealing with it are two totally different things.

I never let the fact that I have diabetes get me down.  There's no reason to.  Outlets like this site are great though for all the different perspectives from fellow diabetics.  Even though some of us may not have positive thoughts about diabetes, that doesn't mean that one doesn't do their best to take care of one self and keep the a1c's normal. 

 

Well, I think that the reason there probably are a lot of sad-ish messages and topics on here is because, for me at least, this is the place I go when I'm having a bad day and want to talk to someone who understands on a very personal level.  I can always talk to and confide in my friends and family, but I don't like to wear them down with 'betes-talk, lol. ;)  Plus, they don't have it, so I can't exactly be like "so have you ever had a pump site get kinked" or "do you know how after you get low..."

I've noticed a lot of people have the whole "it changed my life for the better!" perspective.  I don't, and I don't apologize for that.  Overall, I do have a positive outlook regarding my life and future, and I have fun and laugh every single day.  But has having T1 changed my life for the better?  No, I don't think so.  I got it pretty young so, to be fair, I guess I don't really remember life before it. 

I was in very poor control for years.  It was only after I started to get real and pay attention to my health that I began figuring things out, getting back into better control, etc.  My realistic view of the disease, which is heavily influenced by my experience with a relative who suffered horrible complications, is primarily what fuels me to test and keep on top of my boluses and corrections every day.  It gave me a view of the "worst case scenario", which gave me the drive to avoid ending up that way, but also really left a bad taste in my mouth regarding the disease.  I really hate it.  So, I guess what I'm trying to say is...my attitude about life is generally pretty positive.  My attitude about T1 is that it sucks.  Lol :)

Oh, also, where do you mentor at?  That's really cool!

Hi Abigail !

  I have to say that I have to agree to disagree with your thoughts on this. I really dislike when someone says to me "well you could have it worse" because in reality I DON'T  have cancer or aids or another disease, I have T1 Diabetes and to me this is a lot worse than being healthy. I feel horrible for people that have those other diseases, but this is my reality. Now I don't think it is healthy to sulk about it all the time, but any normal individual is going to feel down once in a while about having it. It is alot to digest sometimes, and like one of the others said I joined this site to be able to talk about my feelings with people that understand what I am going through.

  Do a little more searching on here. There are plenty of happy and funny posts as well. My point is that having diabetes is not something that I will ever be happy to have, and I am not going to make it sound less serious because someone else out in the world has a lifetaking disease. Diabetes in reality can be a lifetaking disease too. This is a site for me to vent and have others that understand, so if my posts are a little down, and they bother you, I am sorry but just avoid them, because I am venting to people that understand how I feel :)

I have had days where I feel both ways.  I was diagnosed at 7 years old, so I also don't remember life before diabetes.  For most of my life I didn't think it was the end of the world, I lived just like the people around me aside from the tests and injections:)  The past five years have been particularly challenging for me; I have developed a TON of problems including neuropathy that hurts so bad some days I feel like pulling my hair out.  The only two diabetics that I have ever been close to or even known in person died from complications; one of which suffered through a couple of amputations first.  I also had an ATV accident that seemed to make the neuropathy much worse.  Despite all of this I mostly think that everything that happens to me is an opportunity to learn something.  As a result of all of my challenges I am a deeply empathetic person, I have developed a knack for helping people through bad days.  Although I don't like to be pesimistic, I agree that places like this allow us to vent and be negative to people that understand.  I don't have any diabetics in my life anymore, so this site offers something that I don't have otherwise.

Because this is a support site. Because people are different from each other. Because I never, ever talk about it with anyone else. Because of a lot of reasons. If you are annoyed or bothered by something that someone else feels or writes, that is a reaction to something. You can assess others' opinions as valid or not, but they are separate individuals from you. Even if someone agrees one hundred percent and says that she or he feels exactly the same, this is impossible. People don't even see the same color because their physical characteristics change it, slightly, from one eye to the next. I think what I hear you describing is perspective, your own, which you understand, and that of others, which is much more challenging to comprehend.

It might help to think about it like this: How would you react to someone asking for an excuse for how you feel? Do you feel obliged to provide one? If you don't care, good. That doesn't mean other people would react the same way.

One word cannot capture an entire person, I think. Adjectives are incredibly subjective. I try to remember that when I look at someone else's private thoughts. I try to remember that when I react to something or feel something in response to what another person says. If I dislike it, I ask myself if it is because I am threatened or hurt by their words.

I am getting better about doing this. I used to just react and not question my own instinct or think about how my behavior affected others. I guess it's what you consider ethical. Temperament and personality are subjective, not absolute, as are the individual realities that make any person's thoughts, feelings, and words.

I totally understand where all of you guys are coming from and, in some ways, I am out of line and I know that. This disease is serious and it affects everyone in a completely different way. It is just so sad to see how much some people suffer from this and it really breaks my heart.

Some of you agree and some disagree, But we can all understand the different opinions because we are all in the same situation. I personally love when people disagree with what I am saying because I really want to learn all aspects of what people are feeling so thanks for changing my perspective.

P.S. Molly-- I mentor through the hospital I was diagnosed at! I built a rapport with the diabetes educator and a pediatric nurse who is diabetic and they offered it to me :)

Abigail,

I posted early on that I agree with you and think you offer a great perspective.  And I do try to look at the positive side of things. I don't think that trying to keep a perspective that "it could be worse" or "be thankful for small blessings" is an indication that anyone on this site doesn't think diabetes sucks.  It sucks big time, and we all know it.  I don't have it, but as a parent of a newly diagnosed six year old, I think it sucks.  I hate diabetes.  That said, it's easy to look at what sucks and the hardship it imposes, but it's important that we and our families realize that despite diabetes, we are blessed.  Diabetes presents challenges, fears, and a lot of unknowns, but I'd take it over cancer any day.

I think this site is great because it is a place to vent on a bad day to people who get it.  And I don't think an occaisional negative post indicates anything more than a rough patch where one of us needs support.  But I think it's healthy to keep a positive outlook and an overall perspective.